Roja, 2012  Ink on LE gelatin silver print; 60 1/4 x 45 1/4 inches  (153 x 114.9 cm) framed

Roja, 2012 Ink on LE gelatin silver print; 60 1/4 x 45 1/4 inches (153 x 114.9 cm) framed

Shirin Neshat (b. 1957) is an artist who has worked extensively with her cultural identity. She left her home country, Iran, at a pivotal moment in the history of the Middle East, Iran’s cultural revolution of 1979, and moved to Los Angeles to study art.

Shirin Neshat, Rebellious Silence, 1994. B&W RC print & ink (photo taken by C. Preston); 11 x 14"/27.9 x 35.6 cm

Shirin Neshat, Rebellious Silence, 1994. B&W RC print & ink (photo taken by C. Preston); 11 x 14″/27.9 x 35.6 cm

Her work probes into social, cultural and religious codes of Iranian society, specifically how cultural pressures in this context affect and bear their mark on the experience of women.

Investigating the influence of Islamic fundamentalism on women, she has used Persian calligraphy, and overlaid text onto skin – representing a kind of tattoo or cultural marker – to create her portraits.

Formally and thematically, her art explores the perception of dualities and contrasts, for instance playing with paradoxes and oppositions between woman and man, black and white, body and text, singular and multiple.

Divine Rebellion, 2012  Ink on LE gelatin silver print; 62 x 49 inches  (158.1 x 125.1 cm) framed

Divine Rebellion, 2012 Ink on LE gelatin silver print; 62 x 49 inches (158.1 x 125.1 cm) framed

Neshat’s photographs are deeply rooted in her personal experience, and during a talk she outlined these four ‘P’ words as convenient ways to understand her practice: poetry, the personal, the political and the paradoxical. 

Exploring her position as an artist in exile, delving into Iranian culture largely from abroad, in this lecture Shirin Neshat candidly presents her work, her personal life and societal changes in Iran leading up to the Green Revolution of 2009.

Advertisements